What are your long term programming goals

Motivation and Emotion pp 91-103 | Cite as

  • Veronika Brandstätter
  • Julia student
  • Rosa Maria Puca
  • Ljubica Lozo
Part of the Springer textbook book series (SLB)

Summary

The term "motivation" comes from the Latin word "movere" and means "to move or something". But where does motivation come from? At first glance, the answer is simple: The forces that move people to do something come either from within themselves or from outside. Intrinsic motivation means an intrinsic interest, curiosity or values ​​that motivate them to do something (e.g. focused learning, forgetting to play, being deeply involved in work, engaging in sports).

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further reading

  1. Deci, E.L., & Ryan, R.M. (1985). Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behavior. New York: Plenary, CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Rheinberg, F. (2008). Intrinsic motivation and flow experience. In J. Heckhausen & H. Heckhausen (eds.), Motivation and Action. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  3. Sansone, C., & Smith, J.M. (2000). Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. San Diego: Academic Press.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Veronika Brandstätter
  • Julia student
  • Rosa Maria Puca
  • Ljubica Lozo
  1. 1.University of ZurichZurich
  2. 2. University of Bern-Bern
  3. 3. University of Osnabrück Osnabrück
  4. 4. University of Würzburg-Würzburg